Passchendaele

Year Released: 2008
Main Stars:
Paul Gross (Due South’s mountie), Caroline Dhavernas
Last watched: February 2013
Review Date: February 2013
Number Watches: 1
Format Watched: DVD

“I don’t dance with naked soldiers”

“You’re looking for romance, kid, you’re not going to find it in a trench.”

Paul does everything in this movie: directs, writes, produces, writes the theme tune and, of course, acts. It’s a really well made, well written film and worth a watch.

Not what you might expect though. There’s a lot of exceptional trench scenes and they’re done exceptionally well but the majority of the story is told in the quiet of Canada during the war. I’d thought this would be a trudge through the mud but there’s a lot more about the awful nature of peer pressure and human nature than of the war in the trenches. Very deep.

I really liked Paul and Caroline as central characters; they both have a believable solidity to their performances. No one is bad and no one is superfluous so there’s no problem there.

However, and this is the reason I won’t be keeping the DVD, it’s a bit nice. That’s not an easy thing to say when you see people being ripped apart and killed hideously but there is a quality that misses the rough edges that I’d want to experience again. I can’t put my finger on it and I’d be ok if it was on the TV but I wouldn’t pick this off the shelf.

Yes, watch it. Not only a good film but I’d say the most realistic no-mans-land fight I’ve seen; quite harrowing actually. That doesn’t match with the ‘nice’ comment earlier but you’ll see what I mean. Watch it.

DVD Extras: Really good ‘Making Of’. That’s all but it’s a good one.

Keep DVD?
No

Watch if on TV?
Yes

Snog, Marry, Avoid?
Snog Paul Gross. Did I really just say that??

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About Simon Trail

There has long been a tradition that a knight will show a crest and / or motto of his family. I shall endeavour to provide such a distinguishing and immediately descriptive thingy over my management of this site. Please be patient. Or Doctor if you're David Tennent.
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